September 12, 2018

Positive Technologies researcher finds vulnerability enabling disclosure of Intel ME encryption keys

Image credit: Unsplash
Intel has issued a patch in response to a serious vulnerability in Intel ME firmware discovered by Positive Technologies expert Dmitry Sklyarov. The vulnerability involved security mechanisms in the MFS file system, which Intel ME uses to store data. By exploiting this flaw, attackers could manipulate the state of MFS and extract important secrets.

Intel ME (short for "Management Engine") stores data with the help of MFS (which likely stands for "ME File System"). MFS security mechanisms make heavy use of cryptographic keys. Keys differ in purpose (confidentiality vs. integrity) and degree of data sensitivity (Intel vs. non-Intel). The most sensitive data is protected by Intel Keys, with Non-Intel Keys used for everything else. So in total, four keys are used: Intel Integrity Key, Non-Intel Integrity Key, Intel Confidentiality Key, and Non-Intel Confidentiality Key.

August 27, 2018

Machine learning: good for security or a new threat?

Machine learning is no novelty anymore. On the contrary: every self-respecting startup feels compelled to apply machine learning in its offerings. The hunt for scarce developers has been superseded by a scramble for machine learning experts. Fortunately, many machine learning tasks are similar enough that it is possible to save time and money by using pre-trained models. Open-source models are also available free of charge. But does this all really work as well as it seems?

August 10, 2018

Low-level Hacking NCR ATM



Many of the systems that power the modern world are supposed to be beyond the reach of mere mortals. Developers naively assume that these systems will never give up their secrets to attackers and eagle-eyed researchers.

ATMs are a perfect case in point. Thefts with malware of the likes of Cutlet Maker, as well as unpublicized incidents when unknown attackers plugged in their laptop to an ATM and stole cash without leaving any system logs behind, confirm what the security community has long known. There is no such thing as a hack-proof system, merely one that has not been sufficiently tested.