August 10, 2018

Low-level Hacking NCR ATM



Many of the systems that power the modern world are supposed to be beyond the reach of mere mortals. Developers naively assume that these systems will never give up their secrets to attackers and eagle-eyed researchers.

ATMs are a perfect case in point. Thefts with malware of the likes of Cutlet Maker, as well as unpublicized incidents when unknown attackers plugged in their laptop to an ATM and stole cash without leaving any system logs behind, confirm what the security community has long known. There is no such thing as a hack-proof system, merely one that has not been sufficiently tested.

July 30, 2018

Pegasus: analysis of network behavior

Source code for Pegasus, a banking Trojan, was recently published online. Although the Carbanak cybercrime gang was referenced in the archive name, researchers at Minerva Labs have shown that Pegasus actually is the handiwork of a different group known as Buhtrap (Ratopak). The archive contains an overview of the Trojan, its source code, description Russian banking procedures, and information on employees at a number of Russian banks.

The architecture of the Pegasus source code is rather interesting. Functionality is split among multiple modules, which are combined into a single binpack at compile time. During compilation, executables are signed with a certificate from the file tric.pfx, which is missing from the archive.

The network behavior of Pegasus is no less curious. After infection, Pegasus tries to spread within the domain and can act as a proxy to move data among systems, with the help of pipes and Mailslot transport. We focused on the unique aspects of the malware's network behavior and quickly added detection signatures to PT Network Attack Discovery. Thanks to this, all users of PT NAD can quickly detect this Trojan and its modifications on their own networks. In this article, I will describe how Pegasus spreads on a network and how copies of Pegasus communicate with each other.

July 18, 2018

Intel patches new ME vulnerabilities


In early July, Intel issued security advisories SA-00112 and SA-00118 regarding fixes for vulnerabilities in Intel Management Engine. Both advisories describe vulnerabilities with which an attacker could execute arbitrary code on the Minute IA PCH microcontroller.

The vulnerabilities are similar to ones previously discovered by Positive Technologies security experts last November (SA-00086). But that was not the end of the story, as Intel has now released fixes for additional vulnerabilities in ME.

June 14, 2018

Apple fixed firmware vulnerability found by Positive Technologies

The vulnerability allowed exploiting a critical flaw in Intel Management Engine and still can be present in equipment of vendors that use Intel processors.

Apple released an update for macOS High Sierra 10.13.4, which fixes the firmware vulnerability CVE-2018-4251 found by Positive Technologies experts Maxim Goryachy and Mark Ermolov. For more details, see Apple Support.

May 11, 2018

Take Part in PHDays 8 Online CTF


Positive Hack Days 8 will start in a couple of days, and we have lots of exciting stuff not only for participants who will visit the event at the venue. Two online contests (HackQuest and Competitive Intelligence) have already been finished, but we have more to come.

Starting from May 15 and until May 22, PHDays online CTF will take place. Everyone can participate, challenges vary in difficulty, and are mainly aimed at beginners, but skilled professionals will find it interesting as well.

April 4, 2018

Is your Mobile API under silent attack?


How well protected are your mobile apps? Pretty Secure? What about the mobile API they rely on? This could be the weakest link in 's AppSec armor. Data from Positive Technologies’ customers suggests as much as 15% of all traffic to the average mobile API comes from illegitimate sources.

March 19, 2018

We need to talk about IDS signatures


The names Snort and Suricata are known to all who work in the field of network security. WAF and IDS are two classes of security systems that analyze network traffic, parse top-level protocols, and signal the presence of malicious or unwanted network activity. Whereas WAF helps web servers detect and avoid attacks targeted only at them, IDS detects attacks in all network traffic.

Many companies install an IDS to control traffic inside the corporate network. The DPI mechanism lets them collect traffic streams, peer inside packets at the IP, HTTP, DCE/RPC, and other levels, and identify both the exploitation of vulnerabilities and network activity by malware.

At the heart of both systems are signature sets used for detecting known attacks, developed by network security experts and companies worldwide.
We at the @attackdetection team also develop signatures to detect network attacks and malicious activity. Later on in the article, we'll discuss a new approach we discovered that disrupts the operation of Suricata IDS systems, and then hides all trace of such activity.

March 13, 2018

How to assemble a GSM phone based on SDR


The smartphones so familiar to most of us contain an entire communication module separate from the main CPU. This module is what makes a "smartphone" a "phone." Regardless of whether the phone's user-facing operating system is Android or iOS, the module usually runs a proprietary closed-source operating system and handles all voice calls, SMS messages, and mobile Internet traffic.

Of course, open-source projects are more interesting to security researchers than closed-source ones. The ability to look under the hood and see how a particular program component works makes it possible to find and fix errors, plus verify that undocumented functionality is not present. As a pleasant bonus, access to source code helps novice developers to learn from colleagues and make contributions of their own.

March 5, 2018

The First Rule of Mobile World Congress Is: You Do Not Show Anyone Your Mobile World Congress Badge


The biggest event of the telecom industry attracted particularly wide media coverage this year: the King of Spain personally arrived in Barcelona for the opening of the annual Mobile World Congress (MWC 2018), which caused a wave of protests by supporters of the region's independence from Madrid. As a result, newspaper front pages and TV channel prime time are all taken by high tech and telecom innovations against the backdrop of protesting crowds. And it is recommended that all participants and visitors to the Congress should not wear a badge outside the venue for greater security.

February 22, 2018

New bypass and protection techniques for ASLR on Linux

By Ilya Smith (@blackzert), Positive Technologies researcher

0. Abstract


The Linux kernel is used on systems of all kinds throughout the world: servers, user workstations, mobile platforms (Android), and smart devices. Over the life of Linux, many new protection mechanisms have been added both to the kernel itself and to user applications. These mechanisms include address space layout randomization (ASLR) and stack canaries, which complicate attempts to exploit vulnerabilities in applications.

February 2, 2018

Apple fixes security hole in Intel ME discovered by Positive Technologies

Apple has released a security update for macOS High Sierra 10.13.2, macOS Sierra 10.12.6 and OS X El Capitan 10.11.6, that patches a vulnerability in Intel Management Engine found by Positive Technologies experts Mark Ermolov and Maxim Goryachy. Details are available in a security document on the Apple support website.

January 26, 2018

How to Hack a Turned-off Computer, or Running Unsigned Code in Intel ME

At the recent Black Hat Europe conference, Positive Technologies researchers Mark Ermolov and Maxim Goryachy spoke about the vulnerability in Intel Management Engine 11, which opens up access to most of the data and processes on the computer.

Such level of access also means that any attacker exploiting this vulnerability, once bypassed traditional software-based protection, will be able to conduct attacks even when the computer is turned off. New details of the study in our blog post.

January 22, 2018

MySQL grammar in ANTLR 4

The main purpose of a web application firewall is to analyze and filter traffic relevant to an application or a class of applications, such as web applications or database management systems (DBMS). A firewall needs to speak the language of the application it is protecting. For a relational DBMS, the language in question will be an SQL dialect.

Let us assume that the task is to build a firewall to protect a DBMS. In this case, the firewall must recognize and analyze SQL statements in order to determine whether they comply with the security policy. The depth of analysis depends on the task required (for example, detection of SQL injection attacks, access control, or correlation of SQL and HTTP requests). In any case, the firewall must perform lexical, syntactic, and semantic analysis of SQL statements.